Many businesses are beginning their re-opening phases, while others are being forced to close again due to COVID-19 fluctuations.  In such uncertain circumstances, many employers are struggling to find a balance between the safe and efficient operation of their businesses, and preparation for potential closure orders and/or business restrictions.

Due to the uncertainty of the

As California employers continue their efforts to weather this difficult and economically uncertain time, the state is also taking steps to assist California workers affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Governor Gavin Newsom recently announced several new initiatives to support California workers who have been affected by COVID-19.

Expansion of Call Center Hours at the Employment

As COVID-19 cases grow in California, lawsuits are already being filed against essential business employers, alleging companies did not or are not taking proper precautions to protect employees from the pandemic.  Employers are doing all they can to ensure they are complying with all applicable laws and regulations in these uncertain, historically significant times. With

Due to the ongoing impact of COVID-19 pandemic on California’s judicial branch, The Judicial Council of California met yesterday and issued emergency rules related to the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Overall, the Judicial Council of California issued eleven different orders, however, three of them will directly affect employment cases.

Statute of Limitations Tolls for All Civil Actions

While litigation over the controversial Assembly Bill 5 (AB 5) continues throughout the state, a San Diego Superior Court judge recently issued a preliminary injunction enjoining and restraining a company from failing “to comply with California employment law” regarding a category of individuals within the City of San Diego while the litigation is pending. This

California employment law is changing once again.  By January 1, 2020, an employer having five or more employees will be required to provide at least one hour of sexual harassment training to all of its employees, once every two years. The training will be required to start within six months of the employee’s assumption of

In a recent case, the California Court of Appeal held, employees could not be compelled to arbitrate their claim under California’s Private Attorney General Act without the government’s consent, despite signing an arbitration agreement. Correia v. NB Baker Electric.

There, plaintiffs Mark Correia and Richard Stow sued their former employer, NB Baker, alleging wage-and-hour violations