Privacy, Social Media and Technology

“The EEOC is keenly aware that [artificial intelligence and algorithmic decision-making] tools may mask and perpetuate bias or create new discriminatory barriers to jobs. We must work to ensure that these new technologies do not become a high-tech pathway to discrimination.”

Statement from EEOC Chair Charlotte A. Burrows in late October 2021 announcing the employment

With health-related data and how to protect it at the forefront of discussion since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, this week California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law two bills related to genetic data.  First, AB 825, will expand the definition of personal information to include genetic data, for data breach notification requirements

The passage of Prop 24, the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020 (“CPRA”), has caused a bit of confusion among businesses in California.  The confusion stems from the fact that the CPRA has an effective date of January 1, 2023, amending the existing California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) when it takes effect, but also immediately

The California Privacy Protection Act (CPRA) amended the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and has an operative date of January 1, 2023. The CPRA introduces new compliance obligations including a requirement that businesses conduct risk assessments. While many U.S. companies currently conduct risk assessments for compliance with state “reasonable safeguards” statutes (e.g., FloridaTexas

Here we go again! On March 15th, 2021, the California Department of Justice (“Department”) announced approval of modifications to the California Consumer Privacy Act’s (CCPA) regulations, originally introduced in December of 2020.  The new regulations mainly modify provisions related to a consumer’s right to opt out of sale of their personal information, with

The CCPA has reached the one-year mark. This is a good time for businesses to review the success of their compliance programs and recalibrate for the CCPA’s second year. Here are a few suggestions to kick off that review:

  1. Privacy Policies. The CCPA requires a business to update the information in its privacy policy

During the California Consumer Privacy Act’s (“CCPA”) amendment process prior to enactment, personal information in the employment context was highly contested and has continued to be a point of deliberation even after the CCPA’s effective date last January 1, 2020.  CCPA excludes certain employment-related personal information from most of the act’s requirements until January 1,

On September 29th, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law AB 1281, an amendment to the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) that would extend the current exemption on employee personal information from most of the CCPA’s protections, until January 1, 2022. The exemption on employee personal information was slated to sunset on December

The California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”) has only been in effect since January, but amendments are already on the horizon. Personal information in the employment context was highly contested during the CCPA’s amendment process prior to enactment and has continued to be a point of deliberation even after the CCPA’s effective date.

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