When Senate Bill (SB) 1162 was signed in 2022, much of the focus was on the new pay transparency requirements. However, the bill also amended pay data reporting requirements in California. Under the amendments covered employers would need to submit separate pay data reports for employees hired through labor contractors. In addition, reporting would need

On September 27, 2022, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed Senate Bill (SB) 1162, which requires certain employers to provide more pay transparency on pay scales and expands pay data reporting obligations for other employers. The new obligations take effect on January 1, 2023.

Pay Transparency

Previously, under California law, employers had to provide an

On February 17, the California Senate introduced SB 1162, which—if passed—could give California the most aggressive pay transparency laws in the nation. Again. The draft California law enhances two common state law pay transparency strategies: proactive wage range disclosure and pay data reporting.

Read the full article on Jackson Lewis’ Pay Equity Advisor

In January the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) extended universal masking indoors through February 15, 2022, due to a continued COVID-19 surge. In advance of the expiration, Governor Newsom announced that universal masking would not be extended again. The CDPH also published mask guidance for after February 15th.

Effective February 16,

In mid-December, as COVID-19 cases began to rise, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) reinstituted indoor masking requirements and Cal/OSHA confirmed that requirements applied in the workplace. When issued, the mandate was only supposed to remain in effect until January 15, 2022.

However, with COVID-19 cases still on an uptick, the CDPH has

Employers of all sizes, potentially including individual owners, managers and executives, should be aware of heavier penalties or jail time for engaging in wage theft. According to the California Labor Commissioner’s Office, wage theft occurs anytime an employer does not pay workers what they are owed by law.

California’s Governor signed Assembly Bill 1003 (AB