While some of the 2020 election is still undecided, California voters were fairly definitive in their support of Proposition 22, which will now allow app-based rideshare and delivery companies to hire drivers as independent contractors if various conditions are met.

A key part of Prop 22 provides workers with minimum compensation levels, health insurance

While litigation over the controversial Assembly Bill 5 (AB 5) continues throughout the state, a San Diego Superior Court judge recently issued a preliminary injunction enjoining and restraining a company from failing “to comply with California employment law” regarding a category of individuals within the City of San Diego while the litigation is pending. This

Assembly Bill 5 (“AB 5”), feared by some to be the death of independent contractor relationships in California, faces a growing number of lawsuits.  Organizations representing three industries have filed lawsuits challenging the bill on constitutional grounds.  In each lawsuit, the plaintiffs have sought a preliminary injunction to stay enforcement of the bill until the

Earlier this week, the Southern District heard arguments regarding the grant of a preliminary injunction to prevent the enforcement of Assembly Bill 5 (“AB 5”) against motor carriers operating within California.

Judge Benitez granted the preliminary injunction and concluded in his order that “there is little question that the State of California has encroached

On the eve of the Assembly Bill 5 (“AB 5”) effective date, Judge Roger Benitez granted the California Trucking Association’s (“Association”) request for a Temporary Restraining Order to prevent enforcement of the law which the Association argued requires truckers to be classified as employees instead of independent contractors.

On January 13th, Judge Benitez

The California Trucking Association (“Association”) challenges Assembly Bill 5 (“AB 5”) by arguing the Federal Aviation Administration Authorization Act (“FAAAA”) of 1994 preempts state laws “relating to a price, route or service of any motor carrier”. After the California Supreme Court decided Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v. Superior Court (“Dynamex”) in 2018, Governor