On August 12, 2021, the San Francisco Department of Public Health (SDPH) issued a revised order mandating that the following businesses require both patrons, aged 12 and older, and staff to provide proof of full vaccination:

  • Operators or hosts of establishments or events where food or drink is served indoors, including but not limited to,

On June 17th the Cal/OSHA Standards Board passed amended COVID-19 Emergency Temporary Standards, which were intended to bring consistency between the California Department of Public Health mask guidance and Cal-OSHA’s workplace requirements.

However, since the passage of the amendments, several counties, including Los Angeles County, have seen a rise in COVID-19 cases. In

On May 18, 2021, Santa Clara County ordered businesses to track employee’s COVID-19 vaccination status. This Order departed largely from the prior County Orders as well as the California Blueprint for a Safer Economy.  However, in conjunction with the California Department of Industrial Relations, Division of Occupational Safety and Health (commonly known as Cal/OSHA),

California passed an expanded COVID-19 Supplemental Paid Sick Leave statute (SPSL) in March, that included coverage for employees to get vaccinated. More recently, the County of Los Angeles passed an urgency ordinance on May 18th that mandates additional paid leave for some employees in unincorporated areas of the county to be vaccinated.

Covered Employers

Santa Clara County wasted no time in altering its public health regulations in response to the county’s graduation to the ‘yellow tier’ of California’s Blueprint For a Safer Economy on May 18, 2021.  Within hours, the County announced a new Public Health Order that went into effect on May 19, 2021.

The Order retires several

The City of San Diego enacted emergency ordinances requiring fair employment practices in response to job and economic insecurity due to the COVID-19 pandemic and stay-at-home directives.  The City of San Diego COVID-19 Building Service and Hotel Worker Recall Ordinance (“Recall Ordinance”) and the City of San Diego COVID-19 Worker Retention Ordinance (“Retention Ordinance”) went

As the #metoo movement strengthened in 2018, the State of California worked quickly to enact legislation requiring harassment prevention training, not just for supervisors, but for all employees. At the same time, California attempted to address the unique issues facing hotel workers, particularly housekeeping staff, through legislation that would have required hotel employers to provide